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Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble

http://vcomeka.com/vccc/images/1992.124.ab.s.jpg
Interior Construction View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Side View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Detail View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Detail View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Front View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Interior Construction View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Interior Construction View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Detail View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Front View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Front View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Condition View of mannequin for Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Condition View of mannequin for Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Condition View of mannequin for Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Condition View of mannequin for Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Condition View of mannequin for Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Condition View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Condition View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Condition View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Condition View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Condition View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble
Condition View of Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble

Dublin Core

Identifier

VC1992124

Title

Teal Taffeta Crinoline Ensemble

Description

Sheer dress trimmed with self ruffles. Elbow length sleeves. Ankle length underskirt with back center panel with large horizontal pleats. Shorter overskirt, open at center back to reveal horizontal pleats on underskirt.; teal taffeta ensemble; green crochet covered small novel buttons; also hook/eye closure (both functional); sloping shoulder seams; curved arms; 2 ruffled cuffs (turned up) @ edge of each sleeve; lining = polished cotton? dark tan, course, shiny, tearing like paper in bodice *pocket near CF on R (new waist); 4 self ruffles on skirt; both edges finished w/ lighter green braid trim matching fichu with self ruffle trim all along outer edge; lighter green circlet covered buttons - not real closure; really hooks/eyes (thread loops); waistband w/ florette of self fabric @ CF; 2 hanging panels in front, 3 in back

Date

1860 (circa)

Subject

Clothing and dress

Extent

26 inches (chest), 23.5 inches (waist), 57 inches (hips), 55 inches (center back length), 24 inches (hem circumference), 7 inches (underarm to waist).

Medium

crochet
metal
silk

Type

Physical Object

Spatial Coverage

United States

Temporal Coverage

1850s
1860s

Rights

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Rights Holder

© Vassar College Costume Collection. Images in this collection may be used for teaching, classroom presentation, and research purposes only. For other reuse, reproduction and publication of these images, contact costumeshop@vassar.edu.

Costume Item Type Metadata

Source Identifier

VC1992124

Cataloguer with Date

Arden Kirkland 4/18/2003; Arden Kirkland 1/12/2009; Spencer Edmonds 2017-09-26

Color Main

teal

Color Secondary

green

Technique

hand sewing

Closure Type

buttons
hooks and eyes

Dimensions Chest

26

Dimensions Waist

23.5

Dimensions Hips

57

Dimensions CB Length

55

Hem Circumference

24

Underarm to Waist

7

Dimensions All

26 inches (chest), 23.5 inches (waist), 57 inches (hips), 55 inches (center back length), 24 inches (hem circumference), 7 inches (underarm to waist).

References

Bouden, 385 (1860-5); Arnold, (1860-1940); McClellan, 328 (1866); Gasline, 189 (1860, +1863, 1866, c. 1865) Brandfield, 217-18 (1865-6); Waugh, The Cut fo Women's Clothes, diagramXLVII; Costume Institute 41. 21.4 American, 1850; Moore, 7

Date Earliest

1850

Date Latest

1869

Culture

American

Gender

womenswear

Classification

costume
clothing

Category

Day Ensembles

Function

day wear

Socio-Economic Class

upper class

Exhibitions

Vassar Girls and Other WomenFrench 280PASWORD 2007PASWORD 2008Engl 101-17; First Women of Vassar 2017

Public Information

This ensemble appears as a likely compromise to the conditions imposed by the Lady Principal Miss Lyman in her 1867 letter to parents on the subject of their daughters' wardrobes. If it is true that you would not 'wish to find your daughter at evening in the same dress in which she had all day been at work,' (on the first page of the Lyman letter) yet students are asked that 'expensive trimmings should be entirely laid aside,' (second page), then this teal ensemble is a solution that is indeed very plain, yet elegant in its simplicity. The only trim to be found on the dress consists of ruffles along the hemline (as they are made of the same fabric they do not appear very elaborate) and the crocheted coverings of the decorative buttons down the center front of the fichu that is worn over the bodice of the dress (hooks and eyes are used for the actual closure). Both the ruffles and buttons add aesthetic interest to the dress in a very subtle way.

Condition Term

excellent

Condition

lining = deteriorated but exteriors = great staining on bodice

Mannequin

size 7 (Miss Hummel's) or size 7, 1986

Storage Location

E8

Repository

Vassar College Costume Collection, Drama Department, 124 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604

Exhibition Notes

from 'Vassar Girls and Other Women: 1854-1925'exhibition, June 1993: 14 1860's teal-green silk crinoline ensemble, 1856-1866 1992.124ab This ensemble appears as a likely compromise to the conditions imposed by the Lady Principal Miss Lyman in her 1867 letter to parents on the subject of their daughters' wardrobes. If it is true that you would not 'wish to find your daughter at evening in the same dress in which she had all day been at work,' (on the first page of the Lyman letter) yet students are asked that 'expensive trimmings should be entirely laid aside,' (second page), then the teal ensemble is a solution that is indeed very plain, yet elegant in its simplicity. The only trim to be found on the dress consists of ruffles along the hemline (as they are made of the same fabric they do not appear very elaborate) and the crocheted coverings of the decorative buttons (hooks and eyes are used for the actual closure) down the center front of the fichu that is worn over the bodice of the dress, both of which add aesthetic interest to the dress in a very subtle way.

The start of the crinoline period came along in the 1850s with the father of French couture, Charles Frederick Worth. Mainly known as the “hoop skirt,” this piece of fashion innovation provided a source of weight relief for women as compared to many layers of starched underskirts, while still retaining the normal dome shape. Initially, the hoop skirt was seen by some as impractical due to its inability of being collapsible. For example, issues with mobility, the ways in which it occupies space--especially for travel--getting in and out of carriages, and even walking through confined spaces such as small doors are just some of the ways that represent the stationary phase of the hoop skirt.

This teal taffeta ensemble was most likely used as a daytime dress due to the construction of the garment which both the skirt & bodice being sewn together at the waist (Tortora, 311). Because the use of the sewing machine in garment construction came to a rise during the 1860s, one may think that this dress is partially machine sewn, however after close investigation one can see that it has been entirely hand sewn. From this method of construction which also includes a variety of ruffles and additional intricate details, it is highly possible that the wearer of this dress could have been a part of upper class society in the late 1850s & 1860s.

In reference to this dress as it is relevant to the style and choice of garments worn in education institutions such as when Vassar was established, I share this quote that was included in a previous exhibit of this ensemble:

“This ensemble appears as a likely compromise to the conditions imposed by the Lady Principal Miss Lyman in her 1867 letter to parents on the subject of their daughters' wardrobes. If it is true that you would not 'wish to find your daughter at evening in the same dress in which she had all day been at work,' (on the first page of the Lyman letter) yet students are asked that 'expensive trimmings should be entirely laid aside,' (second page), then this teal ensemble is a solution that is indeed very plain, yet elegant in its simplicity.

This teal taffeta dress is a great example of the clothing styles which may have been worn by the students of Vassar in the 1860s. As mentioned, its simplicity and elegance speaks to the fashion embraced by the young women of the time.

Tortora, Phyllis G. and Keith Eubank. Survey of Historic Costume: a History of Western Dress. New York, Fairchild Publications, 2005. (pp.304-306, 311)

By: Spencer Edmonds '20

Work Type

dress
fichu
Related Items:
http://vcomeka.com/vccc/images/1992.124.ab.s.jpg

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